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File Preparation Guidelines

  1. What File Formats do you accept?
  2. What files do I need to send you for printing my document?
  3. What is a PDF file?
  4. What file format should I use to save the images for my document?
  5. How do I compress my files (Mac)?
  6. How do I compress my files (PC)?
  7. What is a "bleed"?
  8. What resolution should my image files have?
Q.
What File Formats do you accept?
A.

We will be happy to accept all industry-standard graphic file formats, including Adobe InDesign, QuarkXPress, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Publisher, PDF, TIFF, EPS, and JPG. We regularly work with other file formats as well, so don't hesitate to contact us if you don't see your preferred file format listed here.

Q.
What files do I need to send you for printing my document?
A.

That depends on the type of document you're sending. If you're providing a print-ready PDF, the PDF is the only file you'll need to send. However, if your document was created elsewhere (in a page layout program like InDesign, for example), you will need to include the page layout document, fonts, and any image files used in your design, as well.

Q.
What is a PDF file?
A.

Documents in Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) preserve the exact look and content of the originals, complete with fonts and graphics, and can be printed, distributed by email, and shared and stored for others to use and view. When properly created, PDF files have proven to be an excellent method for generating quality printing.

Q.
What file format should I use to save the images for my document?
A.

There are many graphic file formats available, and each format was developed for a specific use. The file formats developed for use in the printing industry are the Tagged Image File Format (TIFF), Encapsulated PostScript (EPS), JPEGs, as well as native Photoshop files.

Q.
How do I compress my files (Mac)?
A.

Compressing files is a fairly straightforward process. After selecting (highlighting) the files and/or folders you wish to compress, use this method to create an archive of the compressed files:

  • Control-click on the file(s)/folder(s) you wish to compress (right-click), and select "Compress." You can also select the File menu and then choose "Compress."

Your computer will create a new file, with the file extension “.zip.” This is the compressed file you should send to us.

Q.
How do I compress my files (PC)?
A.

Compressing files is easy in Windows, too. Select (highlight) the files and/or folders you want to compress, right-click, scroll down to the "Send to" item, and select "Compressed (zipped) Folder" from the submenu that appears. Your computer will create a new file, with the file extension ".zip." This is the compressed file you should send to us.

Q.
What is a "bleed"?
A.

In printing, your products are often printed on a larger sheet than the final product, then cut to size. If you have colors on your product that stretch to the edge of the document (or "bleed" off the side of the paper), it's best to let those colors stretch, or "bleed" past the edge of the product size. That ensures your colors go all the way to the edge of your document.

Q.
What resolution should my image files have?
A.

Resolution is measured in dots per inch (DPI). The more dots per inch, the sharper your image will be. For printed products, the minimum resolution is typically 300dpi.